Hogtown
Hogtown
Hogtown
Hogtown

Hogtown

Regular price $45.00 Sale

"Hogtown" was a widely used nickname for Toronto starting in the late 1800s. This was mostly due to its bustling pork industry, thanks, more or less, to one man's business.


William Davies, born in 1831 in Wallingford, England, emigrated to Canada in 1854, and soon thereafter set up a stall in Toronto's St. Lawrence Market, where he sold cured hams and bacon. Davies rented a facility at Front and Frederick Streets, a few blocks east of St. Lawrence Market, and was able to purchase and expand the plant in 1875. Soon, he was shipping millions of pounds annually of salt-cured pork. The William Davies building at 145 Front Street East, later occupied by the J. & J. Safeworks, still stands today.


In 1879, William Davies constructed a new facility further to the east, on the south side of Front Street at the Don River, which soon became the second largest pork processing plant on the continent. In addition to curing pork for export, he began slaughtering and processing hogs, and his business became the first continuous/moving rail hog-slaughtering facility in Canada.


Walk around wearing a bit of history on ya, with one of Toronto's nicknames proudly worn on your chest