Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown
Chinatown

Chinatown

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The present day Chinatown along Spadina, known also as West Chinatown, Old Chinatown, or Downtown Chinatown was formerly a Jewish district. Although a small Chinese community was already present in this location prior to the 1950s, this Chinatown was formed mainly when businesses with the financial ability moved from the First Chinatown to the Spadina location. With the influx of Chinese immigration during the 1960s due to the lifting of Canada's racial exclusion policies, along with much of the Jewish population moving north along Bathurst Street, Chinese businesses expanded in this area.

 

Following the demolition of first Chinatown to make way for Toronto City Hall, the Chinese community migrated westward to the neighbourhood around Spadina Avenue and Dundas Street West. A handful of Chinese businesses still remain around Bay and Dundas and Elizabeth and Dundas. Today, the economic and social centre of Toronto's downtown Chinatown primarily runs north-south along Spadina Avenue to College Street to Sullivan Street and east-west along Dundas Street West from Augusta Avenue to Beverley Street. A mansion that is converted to the Italian Consulate is at the northwest corner of Dundas and Beverley.

 

The Chinese population greatly increased as the wives and descendants of the Chinese men already in Canada immigrated to the city after the country's Chinese exclusion act was lifted in 1967. In the following decades, students and skilled workers arrived from Hong Kong, Guangdong province and Chinese communities in Southeast Asia and the Caribbean further increased the Chinese population, which led to the creation of additional Chinese communities east of Toronto. The neighbourhood has been noted as being a "near complete community" with housing, employment, and commerce, along with schools and social services all located within walking distance in the neighbourhood.

 

Since the 2000s the West Chinatown has been changing from the influx of new residents, businesses from immigrants and 2nd generation Canadians. The neighbourhood has continued to serve as a vital market hub and services. to both people from inside the neighbourhood and outside. The central location of the neighbourhood has also been a draw for property developers, changing the face of the neighbourhood.